San Diego Airport (SAN)

The San Diego International Airport (SAN) has been in service, albeit under different names, since 1925 when the small airstrip provided flights from San Diego to Los Angeles. In 1927, it became The San Diego Municipal Airport-Lindbergh Field after Charles Lindbergh began his first solo transcontinental flight from the United States to Paris from a small airstrip just north of today’s San Diego International Airport. In 1928, the airport opened on its current site. It was the first to serve all types of aircraft and soon received the grade of an “AAA” airport. The United States Treasury Department granted the airport permanent status as an international airport in 1934. This event acted as the official birth of the San Diego International Airport known today. The airport now hosts an abundance of restaurants, shops, cheap SAN rental cars and a myriad of other services.

The San Diego International Airport is located on the West Coast of the United States toward the southern tip of California. San Diego is a destination for millions of tourists each year who are drawn to all the attractions that are offered to singles, couples, and families. San Diego’s moderate climate and beautiful ocean views bursting with tropical fauna make the city a hub for vacationers who are planning to enjoy the local sights and flavors or who are waiting at one of the airport terminals for their next flight. The San Diego International Airport is less than three miles from downtown San Diego so passengers with long layovers can book a cheap SAN car rental and enjoy a little sight-seeing or shopping between flights. If a passenger doesn’t have enough time to warrant a car rental, they can still find abundant entertainment within the airport by viewing the numerous works of art displayed throughout the building, particularly in the West Terminal.

San Diego International Airport was the first and only airport in the United States to restrict aircraft from taking off between 11:00 P.M. and 6:30 A.M. The airport’s proximity to the city was the driving factor in the decision, as departing aircraft fly low over residential areas and the highway. San Diego International Airport has the highest activity of any single runway airport in the United States. It is made up of three terminals with 41 gates that serve twenty-two passenger lines and five cargo lines. The terminals consist of a commuter terminal that transports commuters to and from Los Angeles. The other two terminals are connected by a walkway and serve all the major airlines as well as flights to Alaska and, three days a week, Japan. Terminal 2 is divided into East and West sections; therefore, passengers need to be aware of which side their flight will be on to avoid complications.